Energy Management: A row of computers

Energy management: Work Smart and become smarter at efficiency

Get PC about Enterprise Efficiency

Energy Management: A row of computers

I was looking at Microsoft’s Green Blog only the other day and it struck me that when it comes to energy management, however much we try to be green and reduce our power consumption on appliances, actually it was the construction of the device that accounts for the majority of its environmental footprint.  Of course the best energy management solution is not to have the device at all. Ultimately we should work smarter and not over-provision ourselves. This is all too common a challenge in large enterprises and data centers too. At 1E, we are pioneering how to tackle efficiency through identifying unused software and unnecessary hardware, which can be recycled, decommissioned, or better still not be bought in the first place.

Do you know which desktops aren’t being used?

In our IT Energy Management Solution, NightWatchman Enterprise, the PC Estate Profiler identifies used PCs by date and location. User interaction is measured through keyboard and mouse activity for a defined number of minutes every hour and this information is sent to a central reporting server.

This data gives a company the ability to see the number of desks in each building (per floor/ subnet) that are being used or not, and will highlight deficiencies. It would be an extremely hard task to obtain any meaningful data if this was manually monitored due to home working, and the time it would take to collate this information every day.

The ability to report on hardware utilization is an extremely useful strategic decision-making tool. It shows up trends on usage and Facilities and Property Management teams can look into using their office space smarter, by providing hot desks and using existing facilities more effectively, lower the energy footprint, and ultimately reduce costs for the business. Additionally it can be used to create power policies that are in tune with user behaviour.

How many of your servers are idling?

Energy management doesn’t confine itself to desktops. Using 1E’s ‘Useful Work’ technology, as part of an unused server software solution, AppClarity can determine whether server software is doing any useful work. In fact one in six of all servers is not doing anything at all except for some housekeeping tasks such as virus scanning or receiving software updates, none of which is providing value to the business – in fact quite the reverse. AppClarity identifies costly unused software which can be reclaimed which enables the server to be reassigned or decommissioned. Here again, this intelligence leads to a rationalized server environment and better energy management.

Nomad 2012 has a great track record in enabling cost avoidance by reducing servers. Nomad 2012’s Peer-to-Peer (P2P) based distribution and redundancy mechanisms allows an organization to dramatically reduce infrastructure servers by 95% or more, without introducing any risks such as a single point of failure or client overhead. Such an example is Saint-Gobain which had a 97% reduction in expected branch server investment thanks to deploying Nomad, and was able to cut the number of necessary branch servers from 6000 to 200.

Informed decisions, improved bottom line

Ultimately, once you are armed with the right information and visibility into your hardware and software estate you can make a difference. Software that makes efficiencies, saves you money and reduces your environmental footprint must be a no-brainer.

Su Kent | Corporate Marketing Manager

To discuss the issues surrounding energy management further, or to learn more about 1E’s energy management solutions, contact us at info@1e.com, or join our LinkedIn forum, 1E INSIDEV1EW.

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Microsoft System Center 2012 Configuration Manager and 1E NightWatchman® Enterprise

We are pleased to announce that NightWatchman Enterprise 6.1 is fully compliant with Microsoft System Center 2012 SP1 Configuration Manager (ConfigMgr). NightWatchman was also tested with Windows Server 2012 and SQL 2012, no issues were found.

NightWatchman Enterprise will be fully compliant with Windows 8 in version 7, scheduled for mid-April.

We will officially support ConfigMgr SP1, Windows Server 2012 and SQL 2012 and Windows 8 in version 7.

Together System Center 2012 Configuration Manager and 1E NightWatchman provide best-of-breed server and PC power management for enterprises

This highly comprehensive solution benefits the whole organization, not just administrators, users or senior management. It works for PCs and Servers, which together comprise 60% of total IT power consumption. Together, NightWatchman from 1E with System Center 2012 Configuration Manager form the industry-leading power management and patching solution. With advanced features such as enterprise wake-on-LAN, document save and safe reboot, you can be sure that PCs and laptops will receive updates with the highest degree of success possible.

NightWatchman® Enterprise accurately reports on savings and emissions so that you not only save power you can prove it as well.

Read the technical brief here

To speak to an energy efficiency expert or request a trial please complete the form on our website.

Technical brief document

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michelle Hazelton | Product Manager, 1E

1E Blogs


data center 2 efficiency

Power, Productivity and the Internet: Part 2 – All hands on deck

In part one, Power, Productivity and the Internet: Part 1 – The core of the problem, we looked at the issues inefficiencies of energy consumption in data centers here we look at what to do to address them.

A data center exists to support the data processing within it.  Data centers are rarely static and unchanging.  Data centers are seldom homogeneous in applications and data within them, or in the type and vintage of data processing equipment they contain.  As the business goes about its duty serving customers and earning money month after month, year after year, much changes in the server estate.  Servers are introduced to host new applications.  Servers are periodically swapped out with newer models.  Application configurations change, which also drive changes in server configurations.  Virtualization is applied to improve hardware utilization, but self-service provisioning and lack of good governance contributes to virtual sprawl.  As this transpires, it’s impossible to track what each of these servers are really doing, and especially to what extent these servers are delivering value to the business.

The result is that, at any point in time, we have a lot of investment in servers, some of which are very productive and returning value to the business, others somewhat productive, and some still that are not at all productive.  We’d like to know how we can best use the resources that are returning value to the business (those productively used), and especially to remove the resources that are costing energy and money but returning no value at all to the business.  As time goes on, a data center accumulates waste, and waste unnecessarily consumes energy.

Traditional methods of identifying server waste leave much on the table

Traditional methods of identifying server waste are based upon utilization measurements.  If the server’s CPU utilization is showing activity, then it’s probably doing something.  ‘Isn’t it?  Well, it may be doing something, but how do we know it is productive activity?

This is a problem recognized by data center managers across the industry.  In a recent survey commissioned by 1E, it was discovered that 83% of data center managers want a better view of server utilization though most still rely on simple CPU utilization as their primary metric.  Sixty five percent of those admit to migrating unused physical servers to virtual instances, thus simply propagating waste.

The simple fact is that utilization-based approaches simply do not lend the fidelity of information necessary to effectively minimize waste and to offer energy management at the server level.

Zeroing in on server waste

1E’s “Useful Work” technology is truly unique in its ability to provide clarity of data processing executing on the server.  With this Useful Work technology, each process is classified as either Useful or non-Useful.  This data is accumulated to provide a view of exactly where productive data processing is occurring over the server estate, when, and to what extent.  This provides an unparalleled opportunity to eliminate comatose servers or maximize consolidation, which directly translates into reduced data center energy consumption.

On another level, if the data processing is ultimately driving the power drawn by the server, and if we know that certain data processing is productive and useful to the Business while others is background activity (or non-useful to the Business), then what if we could reduce the power drawn by the server during non-useful activity, and restore it to normal for the productive and useful times?  This is an extension of the useful work technology and a feature that enables active power management of the server such that server power consumption is reduced when doing only non-useful work, and restored when doing useful data processing.  This is different than powering down a server overnight (after all, what business is not 24×7 these days?).  This is actively modulating power drawn based upon knowledge of the value of the data processing, with a view from inside the server itself.  This capability helped 1E win “Green IT Product of the Year” in 2011.

 

 


data center

Power, Productivity and the Internet: Part 1 – The core of the problem

A recent NYTimes article touches upon a number of topics in the ongoing conversation about data center energy efficiency. Some reading that article may react as if some secret revelation has been exposed, incriminating our beloved social media networks and data center as spendthrifts or environmentally ignorant.

The fact of the matter is that we live in an information driven world. Information systems are the foundation of our economies, governments, entertainment and many aspects of our daily lives. Maintaining this information and conducting the data processing around it is an industry. It is as much a part of our industrial fabric as steel and manufacturing were in the 20th century.

The data processing that serves our 21st century lives takes place in facilities called “data centers.”  Data centers are essentially industrial factories. From an energy profile perspective, they look exactly like any other factory in that they consume large amounts of resources (electricity and water in their case).

1E has a pedigree of addressing data center energy efficiency and we’ll share that with you presently but first we’d like to give you a little more background.

The core of the problem

There are some out there that will claim the heart of the problem is our dependency or desire for more and more data processing. That is, we are a data processing driven society, hurtling toward the planet’s demise. We’ll leave that to another discussion and instead assume that the increase of data processing demand in our society is a reflection of progress, commerce, and democracy. If you grant me that assertion, the core of our energy demand problem here is that silicon semiconductor-based data processing systems require energy to operate and produce a good bit of heat as a byproduct of their activity. This is compounded exponentially by a matter of scale. 

Semiconductor devices have become increasingly dense (in terms of number of transistor gates per unit of area), with higher and higher clock speeds. As these increase, so does energy demand. As individual devices become increasingly dense, we correspondingly demand more and more of them. The result is computer rooms with massive quantities of data processing servers, each of which have massively dense semiconductor chips.

We mentioned a moment ago that a byproduct of the power going to the server is heat. These very dense silicon chips operate at temperatures so high that one could not possibly touch them bare handed. Interestingly, this large amount of heat produced by the semiconductor chips is also a threat to their very health.  Consequently, computer servers have lots of fans that pull cool air into the front of the server and blow hot exhaust air out of the back of the server. Yes, fans consume loads of energy too, but the bigger problem still is all this hot exhaust air from all the servers sharing the same space in the data center. For this reason, a large amount of mechanical equipment and resources are a part of data centers as well. These mechanical systems are in the form of air handlers, chillers, cooling towers, and plumbing that is in place simply to remove all this hot air from the data center for the purpose of maintaining a healthy ambient operating temperature for the servers.

In an average run-of-the-mill data center today, approximately half of the electricity supplied by the utility to the data center makes it to the power cord of the IT (server) equipment.  Why only half?  Well, the mechanical equipment that cools the data center requires a large amount of it, and there are other losses along the way due to common inefficiencies in power distribution and mechanical and electrical technology (one never gets 100% of what one puts in). To make matters worse still, of the electricity which actually makes it to the IT power cord, much less than that actually goes toward actual data processing due to fan energy consumption, conversion losses, and other subsystems within the server itself.

In summary, we need lots of data processing, and data processing technology consumes large amounts of energy.

All hands on deck

These issues have been thoroughly understood and very publically visible steps taken to address them for many years already. In the United States, the US Department of Energy (DoE) created the “Save Energy Now” program. This program partners the DoE with industry to drive energy efficiency improvements year over year in data centers, with specific goals of saving over 20 billion kWh annually (as compared to historic trends). In the EU, the “EU Code of Conduct” was created to establish a framework of best practices covering energy efficiency, power consumption, and carbon emissions.

Within the data center community, numerous industry groups, trade organizations, and ad hoc committees have been at work on these issues for years. The work of the Green Grid, in particular, has been instrumental in creating the common language used in the community addressing this problem, resulting in a number of energy efficiency management metrics and data center design conventions that we now consider de rigueur.

With governments and the industry itself working the problem, the equipment manufacturers have a role to play as well. Mechanical and Electrical plant (MEP) equipment manufacturers have responded with higher efficiency transformers and UPS, and innovations in pump, fan, and cooling technologies. When it comes to the IT equipment which is truly the engine of this factory we call a data center, the work of participating equipment manufacturers in the ASHRAE TC9.9 body of work is truly remarkable. This is remarkable in that major server manufacturers mutually revealed engineering details of their products to one another to the extent allowing specification of wider ranges of operating temperature and humidity envelopes. This is crucial to energy efficiency in that it is fundamental to allowing reduced energy consumption of MEP, and greatly expands the opportunities for use of free cooling.

Once can go on about this, but suffice to say the evidence is clear that energy consumption by data processing facilities is a widely recognized problem, and much is being done in a coordinated and public way, to provide relief. It’s improper to draw conclusions about a specific data center facility, based upon news of a high profile business with completely different data centers.  Some energy efficiency techniques are available to everyone everywhere, and many are not.  This is a complex subject with significant nuance, and generalizations can come with risk.

In the end, the Business has invested quite a lot of money in its data center, and to acquire the servers and software within it.  Over the years, the Business spends quite a lot of money maintaining and supporting these systems, and is also spending quite a lot of money on energy for power and cooling.

In part two, I’ll look at how to identify server waste and what you can do to eliminate it. 


We’re in the running for two BusinessGreen Leader awards!

BusinessGreen has today announced the full shortlist for the annual BusinessGreen Leaders Awards and we’re pleased to say that 1E made the cut again this year!

We are shortlisted for Best Green IT project with our customer
Newham University Hospitals NHS Trust, which saved 143 metric tonnes in CO2 and of 264,552 KWh of electricity per year as a result of deploying NightWatchman Enterprise across 1,500 PCs. Read more about Newham Hospitals’ PC power management project in this article from The Guardian.

 

More good news is that our founder and CEO, Sumir Karayi has been shortlisted for the prestigious Leader of the Year award. 1E, the company that Sumir founded back in 1997 has made a significant contribution to sustainable IT and energy efficiency, such as collectively reducing our customers C02 emissions by 6.4m tonnes; that’s the equivalent emissions from 1.5 coal-fired power stations in one year, so we’re pleased to see him being recognized for his efforts!

 

The awards dinner will take place at the Royal Garden Hotel in Kensington on Wednesday 4th July – and you’ll definitely see us there!  Places are strictly limited, but if you are a customer of 1E’s and are interested in joining us, please email karolina.shaw@1E.com with no more than 50 words explaining what PC power management, server energy efficiency or 1E means to your organisation.


So how did they perform? Our customers and the CRC League Table

Here at 1E, we’ve been looking at the newly published 2010-2011 CRC Performance League Table.

We wanted to see how organizations are getting on with CRC reporting, but more importantly, with reducing their carbon footprints.

We’re pleased to say that we work with 93 of the top 500 organizations in the Performance League Table (PLT) – that’s a respectable 19%. Almost half (47%) of that number use our flagship PC power management solution, NightWatchman Enterprise including (in order of CRC performance):

· John Lewis Partnership; (2029) Department of Culture, Media & Sport (2018); AT&T (1939); Newham University Hospitals NHS Trust (1922); Wolverhampton Council (1517) in the top 200.

· Oxfordshire County Council (1882); The Department of Work and Pensions (1879); Centrica (1875); Lend Lease (1676); Oxford City Council (1852); The Environment Agency (1827.5); Nomura (1803); EDF Energy (1774); HSBC (1736); Department of Education (1676.5); and SJ Berwin (1676.5) in the top 400.

Of those 16, five are in the top 200 these are John Lewis Partnership (2029); Department of Culture, Media & Sport (2018); AT&T (1939); Newham University Hospitals NHS Trust (1922); Wolverhampton Council (1517). *The scores in brackets denote overall CRC weighted score and the higher the score the better.

Of all of these, we’re proud of all of our customer’s achievements but we’d like to call out Newham University Hospitals NHS Trust. The hospital came in 11th out of 150 hospitals and so ended up in the top 7% overall. Its efforts to be greener, more efficient and work smarter with the IT that it uses have seen it win a number of awards including ‘Greenest Hospital’ at the Healthcare, Excellence and Leadership (HEAL) 2010 and a runner up nomination at this year’s Green IT awards. Well done Shaun!

To find out more about how you can report against the CRC and reduce your carbon emissions using PC power management and server power management software from 1E, please visit:

· NightWatchman® Enterprise

· NightWatchman® Server Edition

We’re standing by for more information about the CRC. We’ve keeping an eye on the headlines and saw that a hint of a possible reform is in the air: http://www.businessgreen.com/bg/news/2123585/defra-minister-hints-crc-reformed

*Weighted Score – The sum of, the score for each metric multiplied by the weighting for that metric. The weighting applied to each metric is dependent on the compliance year to which the Performance League Table relates. The higher the score the better the ranking in the Performance League Table.


Europe

After a series of events in Brussels in April, is Europe now ready to commit to energy efficiency for 2020? The EU Sustainable Energy Week (EUSEW) organized over 700 events across Europe to show, promote, discuss and celebrate energy efficiency and renewable energy. There were a number of events held in Brussels attracting 30,000 attendees, including a 3-day policy conference organized by the European Commission where they announced the next steps to deploy smart grids throughout Europe. The Alliance to Save Energy (ASE) and the European Alliance to Save Energy (EU-ASE) co-hosted the Energy Efficiency Global 2011 as an official EUSEW side-event. The Energy Efficiency Global Forum (EE Global), now in its fourth year, is a launching pad for ideas that change the energy landscape, bringing together high-level officials from government, business and NGOs.

EU targets

Europe 2020 is a set of five ambitious objectives – on employment, innovation, education, social inclusion and climate/energy – to be reached by 2020. The aim is for the EU to become a smart, sustainable and inclusive economy enabling EU and the Member States to deliver high levels of employment, productivity and social cohesion. Climate Action, EU action against climate change is an integrated energy and climate change policy. The goal is to set Europe on the right track towards a sustainable future with a low-carbon, energy-efficient economy by:
  • cutting greenhouse gases by 20% (30% if international agreement is reached)
  • reducing energy consumption by 20% through increased energy efficiency
  • meeting 20% of our energy needs from renewable sources.

EU not set to reach 2020 target

In 2006 the European Commission adopted an Action Plan for Energy Efficiency with the objective of controlling and reducing energy demand, and to take targeted action on consumption and supply in order to save 20% of annual consumption by 2020. Although substantial steps have been taken towards this objective (mainly in the appliances and buildings sector), recent Commission estimates suggest that the Union is actually only on course to achieve half of the desired savings. It is therefore essential for the EU to act now to get back on track to achieve the 2020 targets. The Commission has recently published a comprehensive Energy Efficiency Plan which aims to provide a holistic approach to identifying and realizing the savings potential. The Commission has outlined a two-step approach to targeting in the 2011 Energy Efficiency Plan. The first stage will assess the national energy efficiency targets and programmes set by Member States and how they might contribute to the overall EU target. In 2013, the Commission will provide an assessment of the results obtained and whether the programmes will deliver the European 20% objective. If the 2013 review shows that the overall EU target is unlikely to be achieved, then as a second stage the Commission will propose legally binding national targets for 2020.

The biggest culprits

With nearly 40% of final energy consumption being in houses, public and private offices, shops and other buildings, the greatest energy savings and energy efficiency potential can be achieved through the renovation of this existing building stock. Office buildings consume the most energy of all commercial building types. Lighting is the biggest consumer of electricity followed by office equipment.

office building energy use

There are tried and tested solutions available today to help reduce the 24% electricity consumption of office equipment.

Cut PC energy by 40%

PCs and monitors use almost three quarters the energy of all office equipment. For offices where the majority of PCs and monitors are left switch on overnight and at weekends a 40% reduction in energy consumption is achievable with PC and laptop power management. 1E

Europe’s Energy Efficiency Economy

After a series of events in Brussels in April, is Europe now ready to commit to energy efficiency for 2020? The EU Sustainable Energy Week (EUSEW) organized over 700 events across Europe to show, promote, discuss and celebrate energy efficiency and renewable energy.  There were a number of events held in Brussels attracting 30,000 attendees, including a 3-day policy conference organized by the European Commission where they announced the next steps to deploy smart grids throughout Europe. The Alliance to Save Energy (ASE) and the European Alliance to Save Energy (EU-ASE) co-hosted the Energy Efficiency Global 2011 as an official EUSEW side-event. The Energy Efficiency Global Forum (EE Global), now in its fourth year, is a launching pad for ideas that change the energy landscape, bringing together high-level officials from government, business and NGOs.

EU targets

Europe 2020 is a set of five ambitious objectives – on employment, innovation, education, social inclusion and climate/energy – to be reached by 2020.  The aim is for the EU to become a smart, sustainable and inclusive economy enabling EU and the Member States to deliver high levels of employment, productivity and social cohesion. Climate Action, EU action against climate change is an integrated energy and climate change policy. The goal is to set Europe on the right track towards a sustainable future with a low-carbon, energy-efficient economy by:
  • cutting greenhouse gases by 20% (30% if international agreement is reached)
  • reducing energy consumption by 20% through increased energy efficiency
  • meeting 20% of our energy needs from renewable sources.

EU not set to reach 2020 target

In 2006 the European Commission adopted an Action Plan for Energy Efficiency with the objective of controlling and reducing energy demand, and to take targeted action on consumption and supply in order to save 20% of annual consumption by 2020. Although substantial steps have been taken towards this objective (mainly in the appliances and buildings sector), recent Commission estimates suggest that the Union is actually only on course to achieve half of the desired savings. It is therefore essential for the EU to act now to get back on track to achieve the 2020 targets.  The Commission has recently published a comprehensive Energy Efficiency Plan which aims to provide a holistic approach to identifying and realizing the savings potential. The Commission has outlined a two-step approach to targeting in the 2011 Energy Efficiency Plan. The first stage will assess the national energy efficiency targets and programmes set by Member States and how they might contribute to the overall EU target. In 2013, the Commission will provide an assessment of the results obtained and whether the programmes will deliver the European 20% objective. If the 2013 review shows that the overall EU target is unlikely to be achieved, then as a second stage the Commission will propose legally binding national targets for 2020.

The biggest culprits

With nearly 40% of final energy consumption being in houses, public and private offices, shops and other buildings, the greatest energy savings and energy efficiency potential can be achieved through the renovation of this existing building stock. Office buildings consume the most energy of all commercial building types.  Lighting is the biggest consumer of electricity followed by office equipment.

office building energy use

There are tried and tested solutions available today to help reduce the 24% electricity consumption of office equipment.

Cut PC energy by 40%

PCs and monitors use almost three quarters the energy of all office equipment.  For offices where the majority of PCs and monitors are left switch on overnight and at weekends a 40% reduction in energy consumption is achievable with PC and laptop power management. 1E’s NightWatchman® is a scalable, proven solution enabling organizations to safely and remotely power down PC’s overnight, significantly reducing energy consumption and their impact on the environment. For example, an organization with 10,000 PCs: Achieving a 40% reduction in energy consumption from 10,000 PCs would yield savings of 1,800 tonnes of CO2 emissions, equivalent to the carbon absorbed by 42,000 trees and a total cost reduction of €353,000 per annum on electricity¹.

15% of servers are doing nothing!

Similarly, power consumption of servers can also be reduced.  NightWatchman® Server Edition is the key to making data centres and servers more efficient by reducing power consumption and redundant infrastructure and by avoiding future capital spending on new hardware. NightWatchman Server Edition measures power usage and activity across both physical and virtual Windows and UNIX / Linux servers. It provides continual analysis on how much power is being used by business applications and how much is being wasted on idle or non-productive work. Useful Work™ tracks the productivity of physical and virtual servers, reporting on how much power is being wasted by idle or unproductive processes and comparing that with power consumption by business applications. If the server is busy doing the task for which it was bought and provisioned, then it is performing useful work; if it is busy doing anything else, however important, then it is performing non-productive work. For example, a SQL Server doing SQL processing is performing useful work since users and/or applications will typically access SQL. The same server performing self-maintenance tasks such as Anti-Virus scanning, Indexing, or Back-up, although important, is not doing useful work since it is not directly serving end users. In the findings of the 1E / Alliance to Save Energy independently commissioned research, the Server Energy & Efficiency Report, it was found that up to 15% of servers are not doing anything useful and can therefore be decommissioned or repurposed. For example, an agency with 10,000 PCs would require approximately 1,000 servers. Achieving a 15% reduction in servers (150) will deliver savings of $3,053² per decommissioned server in management and administration costs, equating to an immediate savings of €457,950, and will reduce CO2 emissions by 572 tonnes.   This is equivalent to the carbon absorbed by 14,700 trees, and results in an additional cost reduction of €126,144 per annum on electricity³. Drowsy Server® dynamically controls energy consumption and costs when no useful work is being performed, while keeping the server available if it is needed, savings from using Drowsy Server can be up to 12%. A nominal 33% – 50% of a Server estate is readily capable of achieving a 12% reduction in energy consumption. From the remaining 850 servers this would yield savings of approximately 195 tonnes of CO2 emissions, equivalent to the carbon absorbed by 5,000 trees and a subsequent cost reduction of $42,889 per annum on electricity4. Employing both Useful Work and Drowsy will bring the total savings to approximately 846 tons of CO2 with a total cost reduction of $801,000 per annum in electricity, management and administration costs5.

Act now

The message is clear, energy saving through energy efficiency is the most cost effective way to enhance security of supply and at the same time to reduce emissions. This translates to doing more with what you currently have.  The technology is available today to manage the power consumption of PCs and servers, offering organizations across Europe massive saving. All of which will help contribute to Europe’s 2020 targets of cutting greenhouse gases by 20% and reducing energy consumption by 20% through increased energy efficiency. Act now before the impending doom of the 2013 legally binding targets. Speak to an IT efficiency expert today! Endnotes 1: PCs = average 84Watts 0.084kW x 24hr x 365days = 735.84kWh x 10,000 PCs = 7,358,400kWh 7,358,400kWh x 0.544kg CO2 = 4,002,970kg / 4,003 tonne CO2 (40% = 1,601 tonne CO2) 7,358,400kWh x €0.12 electricity = €883,008 (40% = €353,203) 2: $145,000M / 33,000,000 servers = $4,400 / €3,053 per server (1USD = €0.69) (In 2008, approximately $145,000M was spent on new server spending and management and administration of 33M servers, according to IDC report: “Optimizing Infrastructure and Server Management in Tough Economic Times”) 3: (400 watts/server is according to Gartner study referenced above: “U.S. Data Center Conference Focuses on How to Do More With Less,” Gartner, June 2, 2009) (energy cost for running unused servers continuously for a year + cooling cost for running unused servers continuously for a year assuming a Power Usage Effectiveness value of 2, according to EPA average PUE 2.04, 2006) Server = average 400Watts 0.4kW x 24hr x 365days = 3,504kWh x 150 servers = 525,600kWh 525,600kWh x 0.544kg CO2 = 285,926kg x 2 for PUE = 571,853kg/ 572 tonne 525,600kWh x €0.12 electricity = €63,072 x 2 for PUE = €126,144 4: Physical server = average 400Watts 0.4kW x 24hr x 365days = 3,504kWh x 850 servers = 2,978,400kWh 2,978,400kWh x 0.544kg CO2 = 1,620,250kg x 2 for PUE = 3,240,499kg/ 3,240 tonne CO2 (12% = 389 tonnes CO2 ÷ 2 for 50% of servers power managed = 194.50 tonnes CO2) 2,978,400kWh x €0.12 electricity = €357,408 x 2 for PUE = €714,816 (12% = $85,778 ÷ 2 for 50% of servers power managed = €42,889) 5: 572 + 195 = 767 tonnes CO2 €457,950 + €126,144 + $42,889 = €626,983

UK Business Is Wasting £6Bn Through Energy Inefficiencies

We’ve been sharing our vision of efficiency and elimination of waste for businesses for over 10 years now, but it seems that one or two businesses weren’t listening!

From Carbon Connect:

UK MP Chris Huhne welcomed a report explaining how energy efficiency in the private sector can save business £6 billion a year, cut carbon and safeguard UK fuel-security. The result of an inquiry by Carbon Connect, the report “Energy Efficiency: The Untapped Business Opportunity” has cross-parliamentary party approval and backing from across the private sector.

The report describes how business can reduce their energy use and makes 15 recommendations for how central government and the private sector can work together to implement an “Energy Management Hierarch” and focus on greenhouse gas reporting, project financing, skills and support to SMEs, alongside the role of the commercial property sector.

Only last week, the United Nation’s called for 2% of worldwide income to be invested in an energy-efficient “green economy”. The UK already has a framework of incentives to encourage the generation of renewable energy. If government and the private sector follow the recommendations of this report, the UK can develop a thriving market for investment in energy efficiency too. Through this, business can help the drive towards a low-carbon United Kingdom.

Carbon Connect is an independent not-for-profit coalition, which seeks to examine the key challenges and opportunities resulting from the transition to a low carbon economy. For more information, see http://www.policyconnect.org.uk/cc

Obviously energy saving is an enormous subject to tackle head on for any business. At 1E we pride ourselves in being the market leader in Energy Efficient IT solutions such as our PC Power Management software which has to date reduced worldwide carbon emissions by over 4,500 million tons.


How low can you go?

Google has long been a proponent of energy efficiency and carbon reduction and it has recently announced plans to take that even further. Google currently maintains an average PUE of less than 1.2 across it's facilities; meaning that for every Watt of power that is required to run the IT load, only 0.2 of a Watt is allocated to cooling and building infrastructure. This is an extremely low PUE and demonstrates just what can be achieved when utilizing the latest in energy efficiency technology and strategies.

However, despite how impressive this may be, Google believes that a PUE of 1.1 is achievable in some of their facilities. How, one may ask, is such efficiency possible? Well actually, it’s a combination of factors including smart design, use of the latest and most efficient technology and also location of the facility itself enabling the designers to take advantage of local resources; in Google’s case, the Baltic Sea.

In addition to using free-air cooling, Google aims to minimize the amount of fresh water directly consumed by their facilities. Some of their data centers are already using 100% recycled water and the remainder use less than 20% fresh water. Utilizing sea water for cooling is actually, in my opinion, a stroke of genius. Google calculated that it is far more efficient and responsible to take ‘dirty’ sea water and clean it just enough to be effectively used for cooling instead of wasting fresh water. Granted, you wouldn’t want to drink this water but that doesn’t matter when all it’s doing is circulating through a cooling system. In locations such as the facility near the Baltic Sea, this water can be pumped in, cleaned and cycled through the cooling system 12 months of the year significantly reducing (and in some cases eliminating) the need for traditional air conditioners.

In addition, Google also has a very responsible approach to replacing old machines but re-purposing wherever possible. In fact, they claim to re-purpose 68% of their server hardware. Server re-purposing and reallocation remains one of the most effective ways to reduce cost and limit carbon footprint by doing more with what you have. This not only reduces the demand on cooling, bringing down your PUE, but there are significant savings to be made from limiting the hardware and licenses required to run your business. Identification of servers for re-purposing can be difficult and something of a 'hit and hope' approach for most organizations. Fortunately, 1E can help. NightWatchman Server Edition identifies unused servers and helps you to make these decisions easily and with confidence. 

Like 1E, Google has always been a pioneer in terms of energy efficiency and I’m looking forward to watching them continue to get closer and closer to a PUE of 1.0…Just how low can they go??