Power Optimization
Power Optimization

The recent release of NightWatchman 7.1 includes two important new features: Power Optimization and Reboot Optimization. Let’s focus on Power Optimization.

NightWatchman has long helped many organizations with power management to reduce costs and environmental impact by reliably and safely shutting off computers or putting them in a standby state when they’re not being used. That continues to be of immense value to our many customers but the world now includes a wide variety of low-power computing devices. NightWatchman 7.1 helps you to optimize them as well.

The computer industry has been amazingly innovative in recent years, releasing a cornucopia of 2-in-1’s, convertibles, tablets, and similar form factors. Like laptops and ultrabooks, they provide a great mobile battery-enabled experience. They also include a very smartphone-like experience. I suppose we should thank Apple for spurring the industry to wake up to the importance of design and new form factors.

How are these modern devices “smartphone-like”? Increased battery life is crucial, especially when the device is in standby. Some of these devices may only be used occasionally, such as at meetings, in front of the TV, on a plane, etc. So you don’t want to think about charging them every day. In fact, if you haven’t charged it for a few days, it should still be ready to go. At the same, time you don’t want to miss out on Skype calls or instant messages when it’s on standby. You need to know about those right away. And when you power it back up to check e-mail, the inbox should already be full with your latest new messages. Just like your smartphone.

Intel, Microsoft, and the device vendors have seen the need (the threat?) and have provided such functionality in those devices. They’re based on what’s called “system-on-chip,” meaning that many of the computer components are on a single chip, saving space and power requirements. The rest of the components are tightly coupled in order to provide those smartphone-like features. As you move to Windows 10, your users are also going to be keen to move to this kind of computing experience.

Great stuff, but does all this work as it should? Does it break when things change? Are you sure?

NightWatchman 7.1 gives you the answers. It collects the data from all your clients, consolidates that back at the NightWatchman server, and provides the reports you need to proactively find problems. All broken down by device model, business unit, and region.

And there’s more! How are the batteries themselves doing? Not only on these modern devices but also your laptops and ultrabooks. We know batteries don’t last forever. Do you replace the devices (or the batteries) every couple of years just to be safe? What about those devices that aren’t used in battery mode that much – that would be a waste. Do you wait until customers get so frustrated that they call the helpdesk? That’s not efficient and certainly doesn’t make for happy users.

NightWatchman 7.1 allows you to proactively watch how the batteries are holding up. Have they been discharged/recharged to the point where they’re likely bad? Do they only get a quarter of the battery life that they originally did? NightWatchman has those reports as well. Management and your finance department can budget months ahead of time for the eventual demise of the devices users depend upon.

Power Optimization is a new form of power management for your modern devices. Find out more:

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Paul Thomsen
Paul Thomsen has been a Product Manager at 1E since August 2014. Current responsibilities include NightWatchman product management and special projects. That followed two and a half years at the company as a Solutions Engineer working directly with many organizations of all sizes. Prior to that Paul worked at Microsoft for 12 years, eight of which were as a senior ConfigMgr Engineer for the teams serving Microsoft IT (300,000 clients) and others. That included “dogfooding” many versions of ConfigMgr. For his first few years at Microsoft, Paul was a technical writer on the ConfigMgr (SCCM) product team. His career has been primarily IT-focused but has included several years as an application developer. Paul has been active in the ConfigMgr community for over 15 years, including presenting at many conferences, blogging at myITforum.com, writing the SMS column for BackOffice magazine for three years, and contributing to several SMS/ConfigMgr books.